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​​​Welcome to District of Columbia Sociological Society


Founded in 1934, the District of Columbia Sociological Society is one of the oldest regional sociological associations in the United States. From its beginnings, DCSS has been a meeting place for practitioners and academics in sociology. DCSS offers opportunities to:

  • network with sociologists in the DC area.

  • build a vibrant sociological community in the DC area.

  • welcome new sociologists to the DC area. 

  • promote the rigorous study of sociology and the application of sociological ideas. 

  • continue members’ sociological education and development. 

  • participate in lectures and panel discussions on sociological topics.

  • enhance public understanding of sociology and increase the level of sociological literacy in the DC area, both in the federal government and in the broader community.

  • help develop the next generation of sociologists. 

Please join the DCSS today!

New DCSS Leaders

This spring, the DCSS had its annual election and chose its new leadership. The past DCSS president and sociologist at the US Census Lynda Laughlin has handed over the presidency to Sally Hillsman, former ASA Executive Director.  Sally brings a wealth of experience from the world of professional associations and from the world of sociologists. DCSS also welcomes Julie Anderson, who works at GAO and received her MA in sociology from George Mason University. Wilbur Hadden from University of Maryland has graciously agreed to continue as DCSS treasurer. Many thanks to Lynda Laughlin for her wonderful leadership of the DCSS since 2016! More details on DCSS leadership are here.

​The Sociologist, or the newspaper of the DCSS, began in the 1960's as a way to highlight the rich and diverse ways in which sociology was being done in the District of Columbia.  After a period of dormancy, we have reinvigorated the activities and have a new collection of offerings from sociologists in the area 

The Sociologist

In 1934, E. Franklin Frazier moved to Howard University and helped found the DCSS: Frazier was a founding member of the 

D.C. Sociological Society, serving as President of DCSS in 1943-44. Frazier also served as President of the Eastern Sociological Society in 1944-45. In 1948, Frazier was the first ...

DCSS History